supply chain

3PL Bidding Tips

3PL Bidding Tips

3PLs (Third Party Logistics) companies make fundamental mistakes when replying to Request for Proposal and/or Request for Tender. Here are the things you need to know to respond appropriately to a 3PL RFT / RFP. TimingGet into the dataAsk Questions???????????? Kindly watch the video below to learn more. Related articles on this topic have appeared throughout our websites, why not check them out? Robobyrne: Definitions for Supply Chain & Logistics – LLP, 3PL, 4PL and More Supply Chain Secrets: Why Large Companies Increasingly Opt for 4PL Services Benchmarking Success: How to Prevent Your 3PL Contract from Harming Logistics Performance Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on November 18, 2020, under the title “3PL Bidding Tips” on Logistics Bureau’s website. Best Regards,Rob O’ByrneEmail: robyrne@logisticsbureau.comPhone: +61 417 417...

Read More

How to Benchmark Your Supply Chain

How to Benchmark Your Supply Chain

Well, I asked Steven Thacker, one of our benchmarking management experts, exactly that question! I hope his answers help you. What is Benchmarking? Benchmarking is essentially comparing; comparing one against another. When we compare different levels of sophistication and performance in supply chains, we can identify particular levels that we think are important to achieve, or that represent typical performance levels for supply chains as a whole. Those levels are “benchmarks”. Of course, benchmarks and benchmarking can cover all kinds of different things, at work or elsewhere. Suppose you wanted to be the fastest runner in the world, for example. The first thing you’d want to know is “what is the benchmark?” meaning “what speed do I have to beat to be the fastest?” You can benchmark for individuals and also for teams. You can also benchmark supply chains. Sometimes benchmarks, like how fast you run, how high you jump, and so on are easy to identify. They are simple activities to measure and the figures are clear and meaningful. Elsewhere it’s more complex, as is often the case in business. It’s still just as important, though, if you want your business to improve, to know how you compare, and how good you have to be to be the best. How Can a Business Start Benchmarking? You can start with the things organisations frequently want to benchmark. The first of these is “How good is my service?” In fact, it’s also a good idea to go further, because these days, service provision should typically be a competitive advantage for an organisation. So the questions are rather: “How good is my service today?” and “How good does it have to be to really differentiate my business compared to my competitors?” A second one is then cost; For instance, “Is that level of service, whether current or planned, cost-effective?” This is a question that frustrates businesses if they only have data that is anecdotal and subjective, and lack the quantitative hard data that really tells them what’s going on. This is where the SCOR model can be a big help, because it defines formal, structured ways of capturing data, which can then be stored in a database to provide a better guarantee of accuracy. Using SCOR to Benchmark the Supply Chain SCOR is a method that’s helped businesses in many different areas, such as quality circles. In the general supply chain...

Read More

Mark Powell’s Supply Chain Career Tips

Mark Powell’s Supply Chain Career Tips

Mark Powell is not only an Independent Professional Director in the Supply Chain industry but also an old friend. This time, he will share some brilliant career tips. Watch the video below: Related articles on this topic have appeared throughout our websites, why not check them out? Robobyrne: Tips for Getting a Job in Supply Chain Operations or Management Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on August 26, 2020, under the title “Supply Chain Career Tips— Mark Powell“ on Logistics Bureau’s website. Best Regards,Rob O’ByrneEmail: robyrne@logisticsbureau.comPhone: +61 417 417...

Read More

Supply Chain Advice from Steven Thacker

Supply Chain Advice from Steven Thacker

“The things that matter most should never be at the mercy of the things that matter least” – Stephen Covey, author of the book entitled ‘The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People’ Watch the video below for more supply chain advice from Steven Thacker, Executive Director at Logistics Bureau. Related articles on this topic have appeared throughout our websites, why not check them out? Robobyrne: How to Advance Your Education at Supply Chain Conferences Supply Chain Secrets: How to Get a Job in the Supply Chain Sector Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on August 12, 2020, under the title “Best Supply Chain Advice with Steven Thacker“ on Logistics Bureau’s website. Best Regards,Rob O’ByrneEmail: robyrne@logisticsbureau.comPhone: +61 417 417...

Read More

Boom Time for the Shared Economy within Supply Chain

Boom Time for the Shared Economy within Supply Chain

SUMMARY: For most people, the shared economy is best illustrated by the Uber and AirBnB concept of crowdsourcing and convenience services based on digital platforms. In logistics and supply chain management, however, transport and warehousing are the most significant sharing processes thanks to a welter of economic benefits for all parties—and the trend is accelerating despite the dampening effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. Logistics providers are driving the shared economy within the supply chain, offering shared services to customers such as higher filling rates of transport vehicles, better utilisation of warehousing space, reduced logistics costs, and/or a lower carbon footprint. The World Economic Forum estimates that by 2025, 15 percent of trucking will be via shared transport platforms and shared warehousing will comprise 20 percent of the market. In whatever form it takes, the shared economy will to a large extent shape the way we do business in future. For most people, the shared economy (also known as the gig economy) is best illustrated by the Uber and AirBnB concept of crowdsourcing and convenience services based on digital platforms. The technologies and business models supporting these platforms are also being applied to logistics and supply chain management, especially across activities such as warehousing, transportation, and shipping—with astonishing success. Why Businesses, Large and Small, Think it’s Fair to Share Logistics providers, both 3PL and 4PL, are driving the shared economy within the supply chain, offering shared services to customers such as higher filling rates of transport vehicles, better utilisation of warehouse space, reduced logistics costs, and/or a lower carbon footprint. The World Economic Forum estimates that by 2025, 15 percent of trucking will be via shared transport platforms, and shared warehousing will comprise 20 percent of the market. To get a better understanding of how the shared economy works within the supply chain, let’s take a look at some examples: Example #1: Amazon Flex With the growing trend towards online shopping,  e-commerce giant Amazon in 2015 turned to independent contractors—basically anyone with a car—to deliver parcels to homes and businesses. The service, known as Amazon Flex, takes care of a portion of the company’s last-mile deliveries which, with some five billion items delivered each year, is beyond the capabilities of standard delivery companies. Since its launch in the United States, the Amazon Flex system has spread into many parts of the world, including Canada, the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, Australia, and South America....

Read More